World Water Day

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Tomorrow is World Water Day. It’s a day that was initially suggested in 1992 in Rio De Janeiro and officially adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1993. Rather than being a stagnant observance, the theme of the World Water Day evolves and shifts depending on the current and future challenges. This year, the theme for the day is “Water and Jobs.” Most our readers’ jobs are specifically dependent on water. Beyond that, most jobs are in some way related to water. Nearly half of all jobs world-wide are directly water-related.

1.5 billion people work in water-related sectors. –UN-Water 

The quality and availability of safe water has the opportunity to absolutely change communities, societies, and economies.

What World Water Day continually emphasizes is improving the access of clean, safe water in developing countries. This emphasis includes highlighting the strides that have been made towards access to sanitary facilities across these areas. While most of us take for granted safe water to drink, clean, cook with, shower in, and dispose of waste in the United States, other areas walk miles a day just for enough water to cook with and drink. Others simply have no access at all. Currently there are nearly 900 million people that do not have access to safe drinking water. On top of that, sanitation is so poor (due to limited water for hand-washing, etc) for nearly 2.5 billion people worldwide that the main killers for children under five are water-related.

“Every 90 seconds a child dies from a water-related disease.” water.org

 

(I want to clarify that I don’t think the US is out of the danger zone when it comes to water safety–I’ve mentioned the safety risks that some US regions are facing in regards to accessing clean water, and this continues to be incredibly concerning.)

UN-Water aims to inform and engage others to take action in regards to people that don’t readily have access to  clean, safe water. If you’d like to learn about events close to you, you can visit the UN-Water website, or check out water.org for some ideas on how to help.

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